Tag: Morton College

Morton Offers New Journalism Course

By Collegian Staff

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This Spring, Morton College will offer a course in Journalism (JRN 101-H1). The course will work intimately with The Morton Collegian to offer students not only training in covering events and generating copy, but also an outlet for their work, and a permanent place for them to begin developing an internet presence.

The instructor for the course is Morton Collegian’s faculty advisor, Mr. Karolis Zukauskas.

JRN 101 is primarily a critical thinking course, a media consumption course, and its goal is to prepare a student to think like a freelancer.

Mr. Zukauskas has taught English and Humanities at Morton College since 2003. He has a Masters degree in writing from Columbia University in New York, has worked as a teacher and writer in four different countries (Austria, Cuba, Lithuania and the USA), has published two novels, is about to publish a memoir, and he worked for two years as an contributing editor and content provider at The Good Men Project.

We asked him the magic question. Why should someone study journalism when it seems the profession is in decline?

“I don’t feel the profession is in decline,” he said. “Media companies are struggling to generate revenue, and the old-school model of print journalism is under serious threat. However, new models are evolving, faster than a lot of students are gathering, and there’s a great demand for professionals able to gather, process, compress and articulate information. Those professionals may not end up working for media companies. Some might end up becoming their own media company.

Journalism students may not end up working for media companies. Some might end up becoming their own media company.

“There’s a difference,” he continued, “between majoring in Journalism and taking an introductory journalism course. If we’re only thinking about money, we can rest assured that all skills are marketable, and skilled thinkers and communicators are in enormous demand. The course is certainly designed for someone interested in attending a J-school. However, it’s primarily a critical thinking course, a media consumption course, and its goal is to prepare a student to think like a freelancer while communicating with eloquence.”

The course will meet on Tuesdays and Thursdays at 12:30-1:45. It starts January 16th. For more info, contact the Office of Admissions and Records.

Photo of a Press Conference from Wikipedia.

To Lean In, Or Not To Lean In: That Is The Question.

By Irisneida Rodriguez

women workingAccording to the Morton College student demographics, females accounted for 57.2 percent of enrollees for the 2016-17 school year. I began wondering how many of us have, or plan to have children? How many of us have or will be affected by maternity leave or simply any other time needed off during the initial childbearing years? How will that impact our earnings and status in the workplace?

These are all questions that I find myself thinking about because one day I want to have children but also have a professional occupation. And so, adding to my worries, lies the thought of how will I successfully balance the work and housework (which includes, but isn’t limited to childcare).

I heard of the term “leaning in” in my Sociology class. After reading a few articles on the topic I came to an understanding of what it is and if it’s the right thing for women to do. This social phenomenon has been in headlines for a few years now. The term came about from a book published in 2013, written by Facebook’s Chief Operating Officer, Sheryl Sandberg. The book was titled, “Lean In: Women, Work, and the Will to Lead.

A quote from Sandberg’s mentions,

“I have written this book to encourage women to dream big, forge a path through the obstacles, and achieve their full potential”.

Ultimately, the goal of the book seems to be to motivate women to “lean in”, meaning, to work hard and take their role at work serious to earn a lead occupation, promotions and raises. What are the consequences of leaning in?

An article titled “The Real Reason Women Should Lean In” by Liz O’ Donnell, published by the Huffpost, presents how leaning in at the start of the career (or job) can be beneficial later. O’ Donnell goes on to present a personal anecdote of how leaning in since the start of her career has allowed her to keep her job and ask for more work flexibility. For example, she mentions joining management team meeting via Skype and later says;

“If your employer doesn’t know that they can trust you to get work done anywhere, anytime, they’re less likely to grant you flex accommodations”.

To O’Donnell, building a trustworthy, reliable, efficient and valuable image of yourself in the workplace will help once you’ll need those days off or flexibility whether it’s to care for children or even elderly parents, it is worth “leaning in” for.

An article titled “Recline, don’t ‘Lean in’ (Why I hate Sheryl Sandberg)” by Rosa Brooks, published by The Washington Post in 2014 she stands against the idea of “leaning in”. She mentions her hate for Sandberg isn’t anything personal, but because before she changed her ways and was convinced to “lean in”, she “had a life, had friends, family, children, hobbies, occasional vacations and eight hours of sleep.” Now, she was miserable and had spent too much time building her network that became too tired and felt “boxed in”.

In Brook’s point of view, leaning in is like a trap. It is making women tired and eventually want to drop out of their professional occupation. Brooks claims,

“If we truly want gender equality, we need to challenge the assumption that more is always better,”

She also argues that we must stand against the assumption that men don’t suffer as much as women when they’re exhausted and have no time for family or fun.”  To back up her arguments Brook’s mentions that women work that “double-shift” because they do far more housework and childcare than men do.

To lean in or not to lean in: that is the question. This corny trope came to mind, but it really is a matter that should be of concern to not only us women but men as well.

This topic is related directly to the institution of the family can be sociologically analyzed by the symbolic-interaction perspective. How will your romantic relationship be affected by having little to no time for care when your partner is constantly busy with work.

What is your take on being expected to work extra hours as a sign of being a better worker than someone else? Are you supporting her career? How will you and your household be affected if your partner is earning below what she should be?

Ladies, what are your takes on this matter? Why is parental and family leave unpaid for many in need, even if it’s highly likely and inevitable in most occasions? In my opinion, what this says about our country is that ubiquity in work valued over the personal lives of human beings.

A Pew Research Study of 2013 presents that the percent of 25 to 32-year-olds with at least a four-year college degree has been steadily on the rise since 1993 (when both gender categories lied at about 25 percent). Women have surpassed men with 38 percent compared to 31 percent.

We can expect more women to join the professional workforce and take on lead positions but will leaning in have what we consider “successful” results without damaging the family arena? Or is leaning in motivating and encouraging more women to work to their full potential and earn benefits but feeling incompletely happy in their personal lives?

Photo from Wikipedia

 

Meet Your New Editor-in-Chief

by Collegian Staff

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The Morton Collegian is pleased to introduce Irisneida Rodriguez, our new Editor-in-Chief. We sat down to get to know her this week.

What brings you to Morton College?

I live nearby and decided I wanted to save some money. I graduated with the class of 16’ from Morton East High School. I always knew I would attend college—I excel in academics and like to learn. Today, I am pursuing an Associate’s Degree in Arts with plans to major in either Sociology or Psychology.

Why are you interested in journalism?

I would always write a lot, and honestly, meeting the word requirement wasn’t my problem because I usually surpassed it, anyway. My Sociology Prof. Mr. Drury has motivated me into considering writing for the Morton Collegian.

What are some issues that you care about?

There are many social issues that are interesting to me and worth writing and learning about. I am an advocate of Feminism, Black Lives Matter and the Defend DACA movements. In Sociology, the Conflict Theory as well as Symbolic Interactionism catch my attention. I plan to share my personal views about these topics.

Help us with that. Many students haven’t heard of Symbolic Interactionism!

Symbolic Interactionism is, in general, a study of how we interact on a day to day basis, in our interpersonal relationships, based on the meanings we give to symbols. A symbol could be a degree as a symbol of success, widely accepted by society, so we don’t really question it anymore. Another example could be red hearts as symbols of love. I’m fascinated by how these symbols develop and what they really mean.

What are your plans for after Morton College?

I plan to transfer to University of Illinois at Chicago to obtain a Bachelors in Sociology (or Psychology) with perhaps a minor in Journalism. I feel so undecided because I have so many subject areas that interest me; that explains how I went from an Associates in Science to and Associates in Liberal Arts, as that program offers more areas I could consider.

Work for The Collegian

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Are you considering a career in media, or do you simply want to express yourself and learn how a contemporary online magazine works? Gain this experience at The Collegian, Morton’s student-run paper.

The Collegian is currently hiring editors, reporters and photographers. At least two positions are paid. Other positions might become paid as the paper’s readership grows.

Candidates should be self-motivated, possess outstanding writing and communication skills, and they should be able to meet deadlines and work as members of a team. To be considered, candidates must be currently enrolled at Morton College. Ideal team members will have at least two semesters of experience studying at Morton College.

For more information, please contact Karolis Zukauskas, the Collegian adviser.

 

Photo of Quill and Scroll from Wikipedia.

The National General Strike: Halting the Reign of Terror

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By Veronica Fernandez

It has been less than a month that President Donald J. Trump has taken office, and in such brief time it seems as if all havoc has been unleashed. The president has signed eight executive orders thus far, which include to repeal the Affordable Care Act and the immediate construction of a physical wall between Mexico and the United States. Many fear the power of these executive orders, as the United States proceeded to cease pass to individuals from seven Muslim countries a week and a half ago. In this case, the entire world has witnessed firsthand the immediate consequence generated from this executive order. What is to say about the executive orders before and proceeding it?

However, in response, the American public has not sat by the sidelines, in turn they have demonstrated its discontent with protests all over the nation in major cities ranging from New York City to Los Angeles.

The National General Strike that is to take place February 17th through the 20th is yet another step to contribute to impede this reign of terror. Strike organizers encourage participants to refrain from going to work, school, and to refrain from shopping. Although the call to action is to partake in a crippling action that will affect the economy to attract attention to the malfunctioning political system in place, the complications are deeply embedded into considerably more than just the political system. There are components of racism, ignorance, misinformation, lack of accountability and fact checking, among an array of others.

What remains is the crucial question, is it enough to simply stay home from daily obligations and responsibilities?

As the strike quickly approaches, participants should take this opportunity to vocalize all concerns about the political and social tribulations that are currently being undergone. Participants can contact Congressman Daniel Lipinski serving the 3rd district of the state, Congressman Luis Gutierrez serving the 4th district of the state, and finally, Congressman Danny K. Davis serving the 7th district of the state via letter or email. Partakers can also contact their state representatives Lisa Hernandez or LaShawn K. Ford, and senator Martin A. Sandoval in the same manner.

Another alternative in which participants can approach the National General Strike is to combat ignorance and prejudices with phenomenal enlightening reading material:

1984 by George Orwell

A People’s History of the United States by Howard Zinn

Critical Race Theory: An Introduction by Jean Stefancic and Richard Delgado

Eichmann in Jerusalem: A Report on the Banality of Evil by Hannah Arendt

Fahrenheit 451 by Ray Bradbury

It Can’t Happen Here by Sinclair Lewis

Lies My Teacher Told Me by James W. Loewen

Notes on a Native Son by James Baldwin

Racism without Racist by Eduardo Bonilla-Silva

Strangers in Their Own Land: Anger and Mourning on the American Right by Arlie Russell Hochschild

The Chicago Guide to Fact Checking by Brooke Borel

The Immortal Life of Henrietta Lacks by Rebecca Skloot

The Origins of Totalitarianism by Hannah Arendt

White Trash: The 400-Year Untold History of Class in America by Nancy Isenberg

In a time when there is significant strain, torment, deception, fear, discomfort, and constant anxiety of the days to come, the people of this diverse nation must unify as one. Action is required to keep from the complete derailment of decades of progression. We must prove that the individuals that fought vigorously and relentlessly before us did not sacrifice themselves in vain.

These are the individuals that were voted into office to represent and serve the people; now it is time for the people to raise their voice.

Student Trustee Goal to Raise $4,000 for Hope Scholarship

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By Marcela Ruiz

In times when the media has been singling out DACAmented and undocumented students, The HOPE Scholarship is committed to support these students to continue their education at Morton College.

“I wanted to be the person who knows and shares with others.”

As the Student Trustee, Andrea Chavarria decided to continue The HOPE Scholarship 5k fundraiser to raise money for students who are not eligible for federal aid. She wants the annual race to become a tradition, an event Morton College students look forward to every year.

“When you don’t know the resources available, you have to ask and I wanted to be that person who knows and shares with others” Chavarria said when asked about the reasons she believes in this scholarship. “When you get involved, meet people, it motivates you a lot” she added.

In addition to filing to obtain the permits needed for the race, Chavarria has made great efforts to find additional resources to accomplish her goal. On January 25, she announced The World’s Largest Laundromat donated $500 towards the scholarship.
Since 2012 the Morton College community has also responded positively demonstrating their support by making donations in labeled boxes inside the cafeteria.

This year The HOPE Scholarship 5k will take place on Sunday, April 23 at Morton West High School. Chavarria hopes to reach her goal by the end of this semester, as she will be transferring to UIC to pursue a career in Physical Therapy.