3 Simple Ways To Be Environmentally Friendly

 

By Mark A Morales

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There are several options that can be undertaken that will help control our environmental impact. I will present three helpful tips most people could easily do:

(1) Replace your current light bulbs with LED lighting,

(2) Make sure that your tires are inflated properly and,

(3) Take shorter showers.

According to a study done by the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, LED bulbs are more environmentally friendly than both compact fluorescent bulbs and traditional bulbs. The main problem is that traditional bulbs consume far more electricity than LED bulbs.

“Switching to LED will reduce the environmental harm (from electricity use alone) by 3 to 10 times” (Learn).

LED bulbs will only improve over time, so energy use should reduce (Learn). Additionally, LED bulbs are safer than traditional or compact fluorescent bulbs. They emit no mercury emissions, can’t electrocute people, and don’t have any glass used in their construction, so there’s no chance of stepping on a glass shard (Gustina).

The only significant downside to LED lights are the high cost of LED bulbs relative to traditional bulbs, although the long life of LED lighting (around 100,000 hours) more than makes up for the high initial cost of replacing traditional bulbs with LED bulbs (“The Advantages of LED Lights”). Overall, while the initial investment is considerable, using LED bulbs will save people more money in the long run”

Secondly, making sure your tires are properly inflated is also one of the little things we can do to make sure they help the environment.

A study from the United States Highway Traffic Safety Administration found that:

“33% of trucks and 25% of cars have at least one under inflated tire while 3-8% had all 4 tires under inflated.”

This decreases fuel economy (by creating “drag” between the tire and the road), reduces the lifetime of your tires, and makes handling more difficult (“Eco-Facts and Tips on Inflating Tires”).

According to fueleconomy.gov, inflating tires to their proper pressure can improve mileage by about 3.3% whereas leaving them under inflated could lower mileage by .4% for every PSI (pounds per square inch) drop in pressure. That doesn’t sound significant, but for the average person who drives 12,000 miles yearly, under-inflated tires can cost an extra 144 gallons of gas, which will cost roughly $300-$500 a year.

For each gallon of gas burnt, an extra 20 pounds of carbon dioxide is added to the environment (West).

Considering that the United States already contributes to global warming significantly through our use of vehicles, it would be a good idea to do our best to minimize any damage done to the environment.

Air pressure in tires drops once the weather gets colder, so this problem will persist here in the windy city of Chicago and throughout the world, but we can manage it to ensure gas isn’t wasted. Keeping your tires properly inflated also gives better handling, which helps ensure the safety of yourself and the people around you.

Thirdly, to help the environment, people should try to take shorter showers (and consider taking a cold shower every now and then); which will help conserve water, your money and reduce energy consumption.

If you use an older showerhead, an 8-minute shower will consume 48 to 64 gallons of water while a 15-minute shower consumes 90 to 120 gallons (Skipton). Newer shower heads have limits on how much they can use, but regardless of what kind of showerhead people have, taking shorter showers saves both water and energy.

Did you know that hot showers in particular are especially wasteful when you consider that, 5.21 gallons of water will typically be used while people are waiting for the water to warm up (Rastogi).

It can become even worse if you keep in mind that most water heaters tend not to have very high energy factors, meaning that they don’t convert energy to hot water very well (Rastogi).

Having looked through methods ordinary people can take to help the environment, I determined that taking by switching to LED lighting, checking your tire pressure and taking shorter showers were the easy options that most people could take. Additionally, the side benefits of saving money in the long run by, switching to LED lightbulbs and taking shorter showers, would incentivize you to take action to help the environment. Not to mention the easy one of checking your tire pressure; be responsible -by being safe- for yourself and the ones you love. It’s a good year to help the planet and be more money savvy!

Photo from Jniittymma0, Pixibay.com

 

Tips to Stay Motivated this Semester

By Iris Rodriguez

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Last year flew by, do you agree?

Make THIS year YOUR year. I will give you tips that will help you stay motivated this semester.

From personal experience, I realized that straight A’s in college are not unattainable. What we hear is true; the work you turn in reflects the grade you’ll receive. So, what is the secret to getting good grades in college? It’s not a secret at all. It’s just about effort and good time management, DISCIPLINE.

To start off, set a class goal. Make your goal(s) attainable. For example, my goal isn’t to earn straight A’s, because, well, sometimes things don’t turn out the way we want them to. Instead, my goal is “to earn B’s or higher.” By setting attainable goals you won’t feel so disappointed if it goes otherwise, and you’ll feel even more accomplished if you do better.

It’s simple, set realistic goals that will challenge you, only you know what you can accomplish.

Make it Happen!

Secondly, plan ahead. Making use of a planner will help you keep track of your assignment due dates and important test dates. Even if you’re bad at keeping a planner (like I am) you can set reminders and notes on your phone’s calendar.

Also, planning will show you what assignments you need to finish first. This is known as prioritizing and it’s a good life skill. You will need to rank your assignments from most important to least, and from what’s due first than others. You know you don’t want to miss those assignments due at 11:59 pm.

Planning will help you balance your social roles.

I know that were busy individuals and specially for us that work and attend school, it can be frustrating. But, you MUST take time out your day to study, even if it’s for a bit, it’s worth it. You are going into debt anyways, right? Get something out of it.

Studying doesn’t mean doing a whole T-Note taking procedure, just whatever works best for you. It can mean getting to class early and just going over your notes/study. Try waking up earlier (about 20 minutes or more) or before you’re going to sleep at night.

What I do is take pictures of my notes and whenever I have a little extra time I can just pull it up on my phone (or put it as your wallpaper). If that doesn’t work then try a voice record. Repeat it to memorize; even if you’re not paying attention, it stays on your subconscious, making it familiar to you.

Positively reinforce your accomplishments with a reward. Treat yourself to something you enjoy for every time you get a good grade. Whether it’s going to the movies, having a certain favorite food or buying something for yourself are all ways to motivate you!

Another thing is to be resourceful. Making use of the second floor library private/quiet studying.

Finally, find a friend you can be competitive with over grades!

Last Semester was the first time I had straight A’s while being at Morton College. I had 3 classes with a friend, Angela Martinez, whom I would always compare grades with.  So it became a challenge to get an A. It was a way for me to stay motivated and it seemed to work.

Now, I hope to get straight A’s this Spring semester as well. Especially since I will graduate with an Associates in Arts degree; to transfer to The University of Illinois in Chicago’s upcoming Fall 2018. If all goes well, I will apply to their Honors College.

So those are some short-term goals I have for 2018, what are yours?

Also, as Editor-in-Chief of the Morton Collegian I look forward to reviewing entries for this site, contact me at RodriguezIrisneida@gmail.com.

Photo from WokandaPix, Pixibay.com

Time to Cut Down on Wrapping Paper

By Alyssa Van Kuiken

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As Christmas time approaches and we begin to check off the items on our list of things that we need to buy for our family and friends, we also find on our shopping list things that we need to buy just to make the gifts presentable such as wrapping paper. Almost everyone finds themselves in need of this commodity for kids and adult gifts alike.

At Christmas we all expect to find wrapped presents under the tree, but why not simply place them in a gift bag or another more practical gift covering instead of wrapping paper?

There are several alternatives to using wrapping paper that can be reused when it comes to Christmas time, birthdays and other events where gifts are given. Some options include things like using cloth, repurposing newspaper, or using gift bags and all of these options could potentially cut back on the waste generated by wrapping paper. While some of the alternatives listed are slightly out of the norm, such as cloth wrappings, something as simple as using a gift bag can make a difference.

Yet, according to an infographic found on  Visual.ly ,

only nineteen percent of adults put items in gift bags instead of wrapping the items. 

Why is it that this number is so small despite the fact that using any of those items will help the environment by cutting down on the nearly 4 million tons of waste that are generated by gift wrapping and shopping bags per year (Garner).

Most people believe that they can recycle wrapping paper after they have torn it off of their gifts, but the information provided by several websites seems to say otherwise. WRAP, a UK based program, says that wrapping paper cannot often be recycled because of the way that it is made. Most papers contain dyes and lamination and tape is usually stuck to it, all of which make it difficult to recycle (WRAP). So despite the fact that many think that wrapping paper isn’t so bad because it can just be recycled and reused, it seems that it will eventually make its way to a landfill, not into new paper which will just add to our growing environmental problems.

It is generally true that you can wrap more presents with a roll of wrapping paper than you can if you took the same amount of money and bought gift bags in a single year. However, if you take into consideration how many times you can reuse bags in comparison to the one (or maybe two times) that you can use wrapping paper, it becomes easier to see that it is not that big of a financial difference.

American’s spend an estimated $2.6 billion on wrapping paper every year at an average of $4.99 per roll (Visual.ly).

If you take that number and look at how much wrapping paper you use in a year in comparison with how many years you can go without buying new bags simply by reusing them, you can see that it makes sense to make the switch for at least some of your gift giving.

Also, according to Statista.com, the average American is expected to spend roughly $906 on Christmas gifts in 2017, so even if there is a slightly elevated cost of packaging the gifts that you are giving by using bags, if you lump all of the Christmas costs together it will likely be a very minimal difference.

One argument that some have made is that wrapping paper is part of the fun of Christmas and that kids have been tearing through the paper to get to their toys on Christmas morning for years. This is a point that is hard to ignore. The thrill of tearing open that layer of paper and seeing that new doll or truck is one that many kids look forward to all year long, but why can’t they pull their toy out of a bag instead? Will the effect really be that big of a difference and will the kids even notice a difference if you did switch to bags?

If the tradition of a child opening a wrapped gift is really important to you, then perhaps you do continue to wrap their gifts, but you can still swap out the adult’s paper wrappings for bags. Any amount of change can have an impact. It is estimated that “45,000 football fields worth of paper would be saved if every American family wrapped three presents in re-used material” (Visual.ly). According to an infographic found on Creditdonkey.com, the average American wraps fifteen presents per year so three gifts would not be a big change for just one family, however, when that is added all together across the whole population, it is a massive difference.

Another statistic shows that,

Americans spend about 3 hours wrapping gifts each year, with 25% of people expecting to spend more than 4 hours (visual.ly).

Time around the holidays is meant to be spent with family, not with a roll of wrapping paper and some tape. Those three hours could be spent playing in the snow with your kids or just relaxing. If we were willing to put our gifts into gift bags instead, we would likely be able to cut down on the amount of time spent getting gifts ready.

In a scotch tape survey that can be found on Myria.com, you can find statistics that say that “nearly 70 % of Americans say they enjoy wrapping gifts” and that “28% say that it gets them in the holiday spirit”, but aren’t there other ways of getting into the spirit that are less wasteful and even more enjoyable than gift wrapping?

If you are stumped on what these other holiday spirit kick-starters might be, a quick google search can give you a lot of ideas. You can have a holiday movie marathon, and in the four hours that you would normally spend wrapping, you can probably get through two movies. You could spend four hours ice skating although you might be tired after that activity. You could spend four hours baking cookies for you and your friends and family to share and enjoy. While wrapping might be the thing that some people need to get in the spirit, most people can find another activity that is just as enjoyable, if not more so, to get them in the holiday spirit.

Wrapping paper has its obvious perks from kid’s enjoyment to boosting holiday spirit, but your time spent wrapping could be used in other ways, and the financial difference would be minor. A simple switch to another form of gift wrapping can mean a huge decrease in waste if it happens over a portion of the population. It is not a difficult switch, so as you wrap your Christmas gifts this year, consider helping to do your part and start using alternative forms of gift wrapping instead of using wrapping paper.

Photo by Iris Rodriguez

Perks of Being a Bookworm

By Mara Galeno

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“I don’t like reading” is probably a common thing we hear from others when bringing up the topic of reading. Why do people not read? Why don’t they like reading?

It all goes back to our education. In school, we are always taught to analyze and read between the lines of every single book. Some of us are told to keep a reading log and read a certain number of books in a certain amount of time to keep up with our grade.

I, for one, loathed reading back in 6th grade when I had to keep a reading log and write a page summary of every single book I read–a total of about 40 books for the whole school year.

Wanting to get over the irksome assignments, I decided to scan through the books instead of taking my time to read; ultimately, killing the joy of reading.

Unlike myself, two of my best friends loved reading. They would often read a book and discuss it in my class with each other. Feeling left out, I asked what book they were reading. They immediately handed me a copy of “The Hunger Games” followed by an enthusiastic look on their faces saying, “You have to read it!” and so I did.

I’ve never felt so much thrill while reading a book. It was exhilarating. I continued reading the trilogy and became intrigued. I wanted to pursue my new-found love for reading.

I became a frequent reader and was known as a “bookworm” in high school. My peers would often catch me walking in the hallways reading a new book or two every week (and witnessed my knack for walking without tripping as I would read).

By reading, I noticed a change in how quickly I would read, gained an extensive vocabulary, developed remarkable spelling and grammar skills, and most importantly:   a tremendous method of entertainment and stress-relief.

So why read? Reading can help for a vast amount of reasons such as improving in your academics, your work environment, health, and entertainment.

A great way to improve academically is by reading. When you read, you are reading a book the author wrote–a professional with an extensive knowledge on language arts and proficiency in writing. You tend to see words you aren’t familiar with and you create a definition from the context given. You develop the author’s use of vocabulary, and you witness how sentences are formed and how they use punctuation.

A vital skill you pick up from reading a book is comprehension. As you read, you discover what it is the author wants you to know, how certain topics and ideals made you feel, and summarize the book in your own words with your own opinion on it.

Being able to gain all those skills can really help when you’re put to the test. According to the American Library Association, “Fourth grade students who read for fun every day score the highest on reading assessment tests.”

Reading can be very beneficial when it comes to working. Before you even apply for a job, you must write a résumé. With your acquired knowledge of reading and absorbing the author’s writing skills, you can be able to write your résumé to seem more appealing in comparison to those of other job applicants.

Reading can also improve your speech and communication skills–which is essential in the workplace, while in an interview or speaking with your boss, co-workers, or customers.

Reading can help you sleep. When you create a habit of reading every night, you condition yourself to sleep–especially if you struggle sleeping. Once you pick up a book at night, your brain will automatically relax and subconsciously get ready for slumber.

Picking up a book and reading can benefit your health. Stress reduction is one of many. Figuratively, reading has the ability to mentally transfer you to another place and escape from your surroundings.

Reading may even help prevent Alzheimer’s Disease.

According to the Alzheimer’s Research Foundation website, “Reading books and magazines, writing and participating in other mentally stimulating activities, no matter your age, can help to keep memory and thinking skills intact. The findings of a new study add to growing evidence that mental challenges like reading and doing crossword puzzles may help to preserve brain health and stave off symptoms of Alzheimer’s in old age.”

Lastly, my all-time favorite reason to read is for entertainment reasons! There’s no better feeling than getting sucked into a book. After reading for hours and hours as I use my imagination based off the words displayed on a book. Reading is one of the best methods for entertainment, especially when one starts binge reading and can’t put the book down (like Netflix when you can’t stop watching a show, but better, I promise!)

There’s so much detail and so much imagery in a book that you can’t quite catch when you’re watching TV.

“If you don’t like reading, you haven’t found the right book.”

(J.K. Rowling).

I guarantee that there is a book out there for you yet to love and enjoy.

Now that you know the benefits of reading, you may be wondering how you can start developing it as a hobby.

Visiting a library regularly or a bookstore can help increase your chances to read. You are offered a wide selection of books as well as a quiet space to concentrate while reading.

Keeping your book in hand, on your phone, or tablet and taking it to places with you helps promote reading; especially when you’re waiting in a long line, in a bus, train, or Uber, at a waiting room, or even when eating lunch.

Having a friend or even a blog to express your thoughts and ideas can also keep you motivated to keep reading and even gain more book suggestions from people who enjoyed the book you did.

You can also reward yourself by reading. If reading has been a struggle of a hobby you’ve been wanting to pick up, you can always treat yourself to something you want to propel reading.

Remember, don’t force yourself to read a book if you don’t like it. Read the first 30 to 50 pages of a book, and if it doesn’t catch your interest, simply put it down and search for another book.

If you really need motivation to read, check out 4-year- old Daliyah Arana’s story about reading over 1,000 books before entering preschool and hopes to read another 500 more before she starts kindergarten.

Reading is a habit worth picking up and the benefits that come with it are countless. Creating it a habit can be easier than you think, and it is a good investment of your time. Improve your test scores, gain communication skills, relax and unwind, and simply entertain yourself with a good book of your choice; you won’t regret it.

HLC Report Results: Is Morton College Violating its Own Mission and Core Values?

mission&valuesBy Veronica Fernandez

Morton College’s Mission statement is pridefully displayed on the second floor of the C building in bold blue and orange lettering: “To enhance the quality of life of our diverse community through exemplary teaching and learning opportunities, community service, and life-long learning.” Boldly listed below are the school’s Core Values: Compassion, Fairness, Respect, Responsibility, Tolerance, and Truth.

The mission statement is clear: the institution seeks to enhance the quality of life through “exemplary teaching”. Does this then, only apply to the faculty interacting with the students inside of classrooms? Shouldn’t there be an institutional-wide effort to be “exemplary”?

Earlier this month, The Collegian explored the findings of the highly anticipated report on Morton College’s Higher Learning Commission (HLC) visit last semester. The report included information about criteria that the college either “met” or “met with concerns.” The sections that were “met with concerns” are as follows: Integrity: Ethical and Responsible Conduct, and Resources, Planning, and Institutional Effectiveness.

Furthermore, the HLC explicitly reports their concerns with the Board of Trustees and their role in governing the school. Among the information provided in the report was the decision-making process for the “new president” which was described as lacking transparency in hiring objectives.  The report then continues with a rather alarming statement that reads,

“…there remains a perception with employees that the board unduly influences hiring decisions for administrators and staff and that in many of these cases new hires minimally meet job qualifications.”

The report follows this statement up later:

“…there is a perception that current hiring practices support the
hiring of unqualified administrators and staff who then require expensive training to reach competency levels necessary to perform their assigned duties.”

If the aforementioned is occurring, where are the components of responsibility within the administration? How is this fair to the students who are striving to obtain an education from this college? Are “learning opportunities” being infringed upon when there are unqualified individuals appointed to crucial positions in administering the institution?  If the college is not providing the absolute best in regard to administration, is it then failing to “enhance the quality of life” for the community it serves?

Furthermore, the HLC reports that the atmosphere of fear and confusion has to do with the combination of a lack of transparency and communication that has overall affected employee morale. The HLC reported having found evidence of ineffective communication:

“Ineffective two-way communication appears to be gravely affecting the president’s ability to lead the institution.”

In addition to the report itself, there was a letter issued to the President. While affirming Morton’s accreditation to 2026-27, the letter states that Morton will be monitored in the interim, with a Focused Visit occurring by January of 2018.

Days after this communication from HLC, a letter was released by the administrative office to the Morton College community. This letter celebrated the college’s reaffirmation of accreditation, issued several statements of praise from the administration, noted some items about the history of the HLC, and finally the HLC “revisit” to Morton College in 2018.

The disconnect and violation occur with not only the results of the HLC visit but with the approach, the Administration decided to present this information to the community it serves. It seems as if truth is another eroded value, along with responsibility and fairness.

Moving forward, students and faculty should be taken into consideration with the matters that directly affect their environment, communities, careers and futures.

The National General Strike: Halting the Reign of Terror

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By Veronica Fernandez

It has been less than a month that President Donald J. Trump has taken office, and in such brief time it seems as if all havoc has been unleashed. The president has signed eight executive orders thus far, which include to repeal the Affordable Care Act and the immediate construction of a physical wall between Mexico and the United States. Many fear the power of these executive orders, as the United States proceeded to cease pass to individuals from seven Muslim countries a week and a half ago. In this case, the entire world has witnessed firsthand the immediate consequence generated from this executive order. What is to say about the executive orders before and proceeding it?

However, in response, the American public has not sat by the sidelines, in turn they have demonstrated its discontent with protests all over the nation in major cities ranging from New York City to Los Angeles.

The National General Strike that is to take place February 17th through the 20th is yet another step to contribute to impede this reign of terror. Strike organizers encourage participants to refrain from going to work, school, and to refrain from shopping. Although the call to action is to partake in a crippling action that will affect the economy to attract attention to the malfunctioning political system in place, the complications are deeply embedded into considerably more than just the political system. There are components of racism, ignorance, misinformation, lack of accountability and fact checking, among an array of others.

What remains is the crucial question, is it enough to simply stay home from daily obligations and responsibilities?

As the strike quickly approaches, participants should take this opportunity to vocalize all concerns about the political and social tribulations that are currently being undergone. Participants can contact Congressman Daniel Lipinski serving the 3rd district of the state, Congressman Luis Gutierrez serving the 4th district of the state, and finally, Congressman Danny K. Davis serving the 7th district of the state via letter or email. Partakers can also contact their state representatives Lisa Hernandez or LaShawn K. Ford, and senator Martin A. Sandoval in the same manner.

Another alternative in which participants can approach the National General Strike is to combat ignorance and prejudices with phenomenal enlightening reading material:

1984 by George Orwell

A People’s History of the United States by Howard Zinn

Critical Race Theory: An Introduction by Jean Stefancic and Richard Delgado

Eichmann in Jerusalem: A Report on the Banality of Evil by Hannah Arendt

Fahrenheit 451 by Ray Bradbury

It Can’t Happen Here by Sinclair Lewis

Lies My Teacher Told Me by James W. Loewen

Notes on a Native Son by James Baldwin

Racism without Racist by Eduardo Bonilla-Silva

Strangers in Their Own Land: Anger and Mourning on the American Right by Arlie Russell Hochschild

The Chicago Guide to Fact Checking by Brooke Borel

The Immortal Life of Henrietta Lacks by Rebecca Skloot

The Origins of Totalitarianism by Hannah Arendt

White Trash: The 400-Year Untold History of Class in America by Nancy Isenberg

In a time when there is significant strain, torment, deception, fear, discomfort, and constant anxiety of the days to come, the people of this diverse nation must unify as one. Action is required to keep from the complete derailment of decades of progression. We must prove that the individuals that fought vigorously and relentlessly before us did not sacrifice themselves in vain.

These are the individuals that were voted into office to represent and serve the people; now it is time for the people to raise their voice.