Tag: Women

To Lean In, Or Not To Lean In: That Is The Question.

By Irisneida Rodriguez

women workingAccording to the Morton College student demographics, females accounted for 57.2 percent of enrollees for the 2016-17 school year. I began wondering how many of us have, or plan to have children? How many of us have or will be affected by maternity leave or simply any other time needed off during the initial childbearing years? How will that impact our earnings and status in the workplace?

These are all questions that I find myself thinking about because one day I want to have children but also have a professional occupation. And so, adding to my worries, lies the thought of how will I successfully balance the work and housework (which includes, but isn’t limited to childcare).

I heard of the term “leaning in” in my Sociology class. After reading a few articles on the topic I came to an understanding of what it is and if it’s the right thing for women to do. This social phenomenon has been in headlines for a few years now. The term came about from a book published in 2013, written by Facebook’s Chief Operating Officer, Sheryl Sandberg. The book was titled, “Lean In: Women, Work, and the Will to Lead.

A quote from Sandberg’s mentions,

“I have written this book to encourage women to dream big, forge a path through the obstacles, and achieve their full potential”.

Ultimately, the goal of the book seems to be to motivate women to “lean in”, meaning, to work hard and take their role at work serious to earn a lead occupation, promotions and raises. What are the consequences of leaning in?

An article titled “The Real Reason Women Should Lean In” by Liz O’ Donnell, published by the Huffpost, presents how leaning in at the start of the career (or job) can be beneficial later. O’ Donnell goes on to present a personal anecdote of how leaning in since the start of her career has allowed her to keep her job and ask for more work flexibility. For example, she mentions joining management team meeting via Skype and later says;

“If your employer doesn’t know that they can trust you to get work done anywhere, anytime, they’re less likely to grant you flex accommodations”.

To O’Donnell, building a trustworthy, reliable, efficient and valuable image of yourself in the workplace will help once you’ll need those days off or flexibility whether it’s to care for children or even elderly parents, it is worth “leaning in” for.

An article titled “Recline, don’t ‘Lean in’ (Why I hate Sheryl Sandberg)” by Rosa Brooks, published by The Washington Post in 2014 she stands against the idea of “leaning in”. She mentions her hate for Sandberg isn’t anything personal, but because before she changed her ways and was convinced to “lean in”, she “had a life, had friends, family, children, hobbies, occasional vacations and eight hours of sleep.” Now, she was miserable and had spent too much time building her network that became too tired and felt “boxed in”.

In Brook’s point of view, leaning in is like a trap. It is making women tired and eventually want to drop out of their professional occupation. Brooks claims,

“If we truly want gender equality, we need to challenge the assumption that more is always better,”

She also argues that we must stand against the assumption that men don’t suffer as much as women when they’re exhausted and have no time for family or fun.”  To back up her arguments Brook’s mentions that women work that “double-shift” because they do far more housework and childcare than men do.

To lean in or not to lean in: that is the question. This corny trope came to mind, but it really is a matter that should be of concern to not only us women but men as well.

This topic is related directly to the institution of the family can be sociologically analyzed by the symbolic-interaction perspective. How will your romantic relationship be affected by having little to no time for care when your partner is constantly busy with work.

What is your take on being expected to work extra hours as a sign of being a better worker than someone else? Are you supporting her career? How will you and your household be affected if your partner is earning below what she should be?

Ladies, what are your takes on this matter? Why is parental and family leave unpaid for many in need, even if it’s highly likely and inevitable in most occasions? In my opinion, what this says about our country is that ubiquity in work valued over the personal lives of human beings.

A Pew Research Study of 2013 presents that the percent of 25 to 32-year-olds with at least a four-year college degree has been steadily on the rise since 1993 (when both gender categories lied at about 25 percent). Women have surpassed men with 38 percent compared to 31 percent.

We can expect more women to join the professional workforce and take on lead positions but will leaning in have what we consider “successful” results without damaging the family arena? Or is leaning in motivating and encouraging more women to work to their full potential and earn benefits but feeling incompletely happy in their personal lives?

Photo from Wikipedia

 

An Introduction From the New Student Trustee

By Estefani Hernandez

Hello everyone,

It is a true honor to be the 2017 elect student trustee. My motivation to run for student trustee was my desire of wanting to make a difference. Therefore my campaign was focused on the change we all want to see. As a student and employee of Morton College, I’ve learned to see that there is always room for improvement.

DuFullSizeRenderring my term, I would like to improve communication between staff, faculty, and students. As first generation college student, I’ve learned that communication is key for success. Improving communication will be a challenging project to work on, but I know that it is possible and definitely worth it.

I am also looking forward to increasing the exposure of Morton College. With that being said, I’d like to work on creating and increasing community activities. Exposing the college will bring many great changes and increase student involvement with more enjoyable experiences.

Another direct goal I have is to increase the opportunities for students who do not qualify for financial aid. A lot of students in our community do not have enough resources to pursue their education and as a student trustee, I will love to find ways to help open more doors.

Although there are many things I will like to do as a student trustee, these are my main goals. I am aware that I represent the student body and I will like to encourage every student to send me their ideas/needs to Estefani.hernandez@Morton.edu. I will try to work on everything I can to make our student experience the best.

 

 

 

Students Learn about Sexual Assault Awareness and How to Be an Active Bystander

Pillars

By Marcela Ruiz

Morton College has been hosting a series of events regarding sexual assault awareness during this month.
 On April 12th, the Sexual Assault and Bystander intervention workshop took place at the student union at 1:00 p.m. Kevin DeMarce, outreach coordinator for Pillars; was the guest speaker. He began his presentation by showing the video Dear Daddy.
 “I will be born a girl”, the main statement presented in the video indicated that a woman’s biggest danger is her vulnerability.
 DeMarce discussed how sexual assault awareness begins with educating men. He believes point of views and attitudes towards women are formed from childhood. In turn, during teen years these attributes can manifest themselves in either a positive or negative manner.
 “How can we change these messages? Do these attitudes change in college or do they become more discrete?” he asked the audience, referring to how people express about women in a sexual manner.
 A student commented that she believes these types of conversations are taboo in most cultures; which makes it more difficult to prevent the assault or for victims to come forward.
 According to the department of justice 1 of 5 women and one of 16 men are victims of sexual assault while in college.  Surprisingly, 90 percent of these victims do not report the assault. In part, “because they are fearful of their attacker”, said DeMarce. He added that, “Victims may also be ashamed to go to trial and having to deal with people’s perception of them, or feelings of guilt. But the most prevalent reason remains to be the belief that no one is going to do anything anyways.”

“no one is going to do anything anyways.”

DeMarce mentioned that people tend to help when they are alone rather than in a group. To be an active bystander means that if someone presence a comment or abuse he/she: “does not wait for someone else, a person alone has to be the one stepping up”.
Lastly the video “Who Are You?”, was presented to help students visualize when is the possible right time to intervene to prevent sexual assault and how the outcome can be different.
For further questions about Pillars and the available programs, outreach coordinator Kevin DeMarce can be reached at kdemarce@pillarscommunity.org

Chicagoans Speak Out for Equal Job Rights for Women as They Celebrate International Women’s Day

20170308_184339By Domingo Xavier Casanova

On March 8th, prestigious speakers and nearly 400 men and women assembled outside the James R. Thompson Center in downtown Chicago. They spoke about the importance of women within the workplace and the economy while celebrating International Working Women’s Day.

Workplace inequality between male and females has long been an issue in the world and in the United States. In 2015, full-time American workers who were female only earned 80% of what American men earned, measuring up to be a wage gap of 20% between the two sexes.

Prestigious speakers, from organizers, editors, and activists of differing organizations supporting women’s rights, equality for all, and a global minimum wage, came out to speak in support of International Working Women’s Day.

Zerlina Smith, 29th Ward and Action Now activist, was the most prominent speaker at the event. She spoke about the importance of their battle for the future, as her young daughter and another girl, sat at her feet.

Because we need our legislators to actually write some real policies that will not just affect us now, but will affect these little ladies later on in life.”

Men and women, bracing the windy conditions, spoke out positively about women in the workplace and their importance to the United States economy.They also gave reasons on how equality in the workplace can be achieved. Some suggested that equality can be achieved through changing people’s attitudes, others noted that legislation that support women needs to be promoted and passed, and others suggested simply fighting for it.

Juan-Carlos Parker, a former Morton West graduate who was at the rally supported this final point of view. “When you’re asking for a seat at the table, the people already at the table aren’t usually happy about it.”

Morton College students support women’s equality, in and out of the workplace. Women and men all voiced their support for women, but all acknowledged the long fight ahead for them. A Morton College student, wishing to remain anonymous, said, “I will most likely not see the end of the fight for women’s equality in and out of the workplace.”

But Morton College students also stressed the importance of being one. Eunice Bonilla said she found it encouraging to see men and women, “Band together toward the social, economic, and political equality of the sexes.”

The fight for women’s rights, in the workplace and out, will continue to be fought over in the next coming years. And their determination is not lost out to the people, as the 400 men and women ended their protest outside James R. Thompson Center by shouting, “Stand up and fight!” as passing bystanders looked on in curiosity, and some clapped in support.